Carl Perkins' son talks about rockabilly father, but not about Elvis

Blogging at Forbes.com, writer and musician Josh Max visited Memphis to interview Stan Perkins, legacy-keeper for his late father, the Sun Records artist and rockabilly pioneer Carl Perkins. It turns out that the younger Perkins is wary of j ournalists these days:

"People call me up askin' for an interview about my Daddy," he says. "They come out here and it turns out they're doing an article about Elvis," he says. "After all these years, it's enough Elvis."

While Perkins might be overshadowed somewhat by some of his contemporaries, his influence continues to be felt even on Broadway:

Perkins, unlike his more legendary brethren, never had another million-seller after "Blue Suede Shoes." But his legend lived stubbornly on, kept alive by fans, by the recordings The Beatles made of three of his songs, and, more recently, by the hit Broadway show "Million Dollar Quartet," a musical to do with one legendary, impromptu piano-vocal jam featuring Perkins, Presley, Lewis and Cash.

(More about the "Million Dollar Quartet" here and here.) Guitarists and those interested in old instruments will enjoy seeing Max's photos and video of Perkins' 1955 Gibson Les Paul Standard, which he played on the original "Blue Suede Shoes." It turns out that the guitar had gone missing for many years.

"Daddy had it painted after 'Shoes' became a hit," he says, "And then he let someone borrow it.  It got away from him for 20 years and he finally found it in a pawn shop in Alabama in 1979 and bought it back.  The only way to ID it was by the belt buckle where the plug went into the guitar.  Dad put it on because he thought it looked cool."

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